3rd Grade Course Descriptions

Course Description & Expectations:
Third Grade is year of transition for many students. It is the first time students are responsible for such standardized testing as the TEKS.
 
These are the course expectations and objectives based on Reading and Math TEKS.
 
 
Third Grade Reading TEKS

 

In Grade 3, students read and write more independently than in any previous grade

and spend significant blocks of time engaged in reading and writing on their own as well

as in assigned tasks and projects.

 

Students listen critically to spoken messages, think

about their own contributions to discussions, and plan their oral presentations. Third

grade students read grade-level material fluently and with comprehension.

 

Students use root words, prefixes, suffixes, and derivational endings to recognize words.

Students demonstrate knowledge of synonyms, antonyms, and multi-meaning words.

 

Students are beginning to distinguish fact from opinion in texts. During class discussions, third grade students support their ideas and inferences by citing portions of the text being discussed.

 

Students read in a variety of genres, including realistic and imaginative fiction,

nonfiction, and poetry from classic and contemporary works.

 

Third grade students write with more complex capitalization and punctuation such as proper nouns and commas in a series.

 

Students write with more proficient spelling of contractions and homonyms.

 

Third grade students write longer and more elaborate sentences and organize their writing into larger units of text.

 
 
Third Grade Math TEKS
 

 

(3.1) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses place value to communicate about increasingly large whole numbers in verbal and written

form, including money. The student is expected to:

(A) use place value to read, write (in symbols and words), and describe the value of

whole numbers through 999,999;

(B) use place value to compare and order whole numbers through 9,999; and

(C) determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.

 

 

(3.2) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses fraction names and symbols (with denominators of 12 or less) to describe fractional parts

of whole objects or sets of objects. The student is expected to:

(A) construct concrete models of fractions;

(B) compare fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects in a problem situation

using concrete models;

 (C) use fraction names and symbols to describe fractional parts of whole objects or

sets of objects; and

 (D) construct concrete models of equivalent fractions for fractional parts of whole

objects.

 

(3.3) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds and subtracts to solve meaningful problems involving whole numbers. The student is expected to:

 

(A) model addition and subtraction using pictures, words, and numbers; and

B) select addition or subtraction

 

 

 

(3.4) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning.

The student recognizes and solves problems in multiplication and division situations. The student is expected to:

 

(A) learn and apply multiplication facts through 12 by 12 using concrete models and

objects;

(B) solve and record multiplication problems (up to two digits times one digit); and

(C) use models to solve division problems and use number sentences to record the

solutions.