1st Nine Weeks  
                          August 27-October 26

WEEK #

Unit 1

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 1

Lesson 1

A Fine, Fine School

Humorous Fiction & Informational Text

Week 2

Lesson 2

The Trial of Cardigan Jones

Fantasy & Reader’s Theatre

Week 3

Lesson 3

Destiny’s Gift

Realistic Fiction & Informational Text

Week 4

Lesson 4

Pop’s Bridge

Historical Fiction & Information Text

Week 5

Lesson 5

Roberto Clemente

Biography & Poetry

WEEK #

Unit 2

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 6

Lesson 6

Max’s Words

Humorous Fiction & Poetry

Week 7

Lesson 7

What Illustrations Do?

Informational Text & Fairy Tale

Week 8

Lesson 8

The Harvest Birds

Folk Tale & Reader’s Theatre

Week 9

Benchmark Week-Prep/Assess/ Analyze (Reading)

                                                               2nd Nine Weeks
 
                        October 29-January 19

WEEK #

Unit 2

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 10

Lesson 9

Kamishibia Man

Realistic Fiction & Information Text

Week 11

Lesson 10

Young Thomas Edison

Biography & Informational Text

WEEK #

Unit 3

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 12

Lesson 11

Jump!

Biography & Informational Text

Week 13

Lesson 12

The Science Fair

Realistic Fiction & Poetry

Week 14

Lesson 13

Yonder Mountain: A Cherokee Legend

Legend & Informational Text

Week 15

Lesson 14

Aero and Officer Mike

Informational Text

Week 16

Lesson 15

The Extra-good Sunday

Humorous Fiction & Reader’s Theatre

WEEK #

Unit 4

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 17

Lesson 16

A Mr. Rubbish Mood

Humorous Fiction & Informational Text

Week 18

Benchmark Week-Prep/Assess/ Analyze (Reading)

                                              3rd Nine Weeks
                       January 22-March 29

WEEK #

Unit 4

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 19

Lesson 17

The Albertosaurus Mystery

Informational Text

Week 20

Lesson 18

A Tree is Growing

Informational Text & Poetry

Week 21

Lesson 19

Dogzilla

Fantasy & Informational Text

Week 22

Lesson 20

Life on the Ice

Informational Text & Reader’s Theatre

WEEK #

Unit 5

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 23

Lesson 21

Two Bad Ants

Fantasy & Poetry

Week 24

Lesson 22

The Journey: Stories of Migration

Informational Text & Fable

Week 25

Lesson 23

The Journey of Oliver K. Woodman

Fantasy & Informational Text

Week 26

Lesson 24

Dog-of-Sea Waves

Realistic Fiction & Informational Text

Week 27

Benchmark Week-Prep/Assess/ Analyze (Reading)


                                    4th Nine Weeks
                          April 1- June 7 

WEEK #

Unit 5

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 28

Lesson 25

Mountains: Surviving on Mt. Everest

Informational Text & Play

WEEK #

Unit 6

MAIN SELECTION TITLES

MAIN & PAIRED GENRES

Week 29

Lesson 26

The Foot Race Across America

Informational Text & Traditional Tale

Week 30

STAAR Prep/Review

Week 31

STAAR –Reading & Math

Week 32

Lesson 27

The Power of Magnets

Informational Text

Week 33

Lesson 28

Becoming Anything He Wants to Be

Informational Text & Journal Entry

Week 34

Lesson 28

A New Team of Heroes

Play & Informational Text

Week 35

Lesson 30

Saving Buster

Fiction & Informational Text

Week 36

Fountas & Pinnell Assessment

MATH TEKS 
 
(3.1) The student is expected to:

(A) use place value to read, write (in symbols and words), and describe the value of whole numbers through 999,999;

(B) use place value to compare and order whole numbers through 9,999; and

(C) determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.

 

(3.2) The student is expected to:

(A) construct concrete models of fractions;

(B) compare fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects in a problem situation using concrete models;

(C) use fraction names and symbols to describe fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects; and

(D) construct concrete models of equivalent fractions for fractional parts of whole objects.

 

(3.3) The student is expected to:

(A) model addition and subtraction using pictures, words, and numbers; and

(B) select addition or subtraction and use the operation to solve problems involving whole numbers through 999.

 

(3.4) The student is expected to: revised August 2012

(A) learn and apply multiplication facts through 12 by 12 using concrete models and objects;

(B) solve and record multiplication problems (up to two digits times one digit); and

(C) use models to solve division problems and use number sentences to record the solutions.

 

(3.5) The student is expected to:

(A) round whole numbers to the nearest ten or hundred to approximate reasonable results in problem situations; and

(B) use strategies including rounding and compatible numbers to estimate solutions to addition and subtraction problems.

 

(3.6) The student is expected to:

(A) identify and extend whole-number and geometric patterns to make predictions and solve problems;

(B) identify patterns in multiplication facts using concrete objects, pictorial models, or technology; and

(C) identify patterns in related multiplication and division sentences (fact families) such as 2 x 3 = 6, 3 x 2 = 6, 6 ÷ 2 = 3, 6 ÷ 3 = 2.

 

(3.7) The student is expected to:

(A) generate a table of paired numbers based on a real-life situation such as insects and legs; and

(B) identify and describe patterns in a table of related number pairs based on a meaningful problem and extend the table.

 

(3.8) The student is expected to:

 

(3.9) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student recognizes congruence and symmetry. The student is expected to:

(A) identify congruent two-dimensional figures; revised August 2012

(B) create two-dimensional figures with lines of symmetry using concrete models and technology; and

(C) identify lines of symmetry in two-dimensional geometric figures.

 

(3.10)  The student is expected to locate and name points on a number line using whole numbers and fractions, including halves and fourths.

 

(3.11) The student is expected to:

(A) use linear measurement tools to estimate and measure lengths using standard units;

(B) use standard units to find the perimeter of a shape;

(C) use concrete and pictorial models of square units to determine the area of two-dimensional surfaces;

(D) identify concrete models that approximate standard units of weight/mass and use them to measure weight/mass;

(E) identify concrete models that approximate standard units for capacity and use them to measure capacity; and

(F) use concrete models that approximate cubic units to determine the volume of a given container or other three-dimensional geometric figure.

 

(3.12) The student is expected to:

(A) use a thermometer to measure temperature; and

(B) tell and write time shown on analog and digital clocks.

 

(3.13) The student is expected to:

(A) collect, organize, record, and display data in pictographs and bar graphs where each picture or cell might represent more than one piece of data;

(B) interpret information from pictographs and bar graphs; and

(C) use data to describe events as more likely than, less likely than, or equally likely as. revised August 2012

 

(3.14) The student is expected to:

(A) identify the mathematics in everyday situations;

(B) solve problems that incorporate understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;

(C) select or develop an appropriate problem-solving plan or strategy, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem; and

(D) use tools such as real objects, manipulatives, and technology to solve problems.

 

(3.15) The student is expected to:

(A) explain and record observations using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology; and

(B) relate informal language to mathematical language and symbols.

 

(3.16) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student uses logical reasoning. The student is expected to:

(A) make generalizations from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples; and

(B) justify why an answer is reasonable and explain the solution process.