Course Description

The "Big Idea" of high school mathematics instruction is for students to develop mathematical proficiency that will enable them to efficiently use mathematics to make sense of and improve the world around them.

 

To review the state of Texas' standards for these courses please visit the TEA website.

 

Math Models

 

Math Models is a problem-solving math course. Much of the material covered will have been touched on in a previous course; however, we will examine each topic in detail through word problems and real world situations. Students will use technology and models to investigate and explore mathematical ideas and relationships and develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations.Students will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life's experiences.
 
Advanced Quantitative Reasoning
 
In Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, students will develop and apply skills necessary for college, careers, and life. Course content consists primarily of applications of high school mathematics concepts to prepare students to become well-educated and highly informed 21st century citizens. Students will develop and apply reasoning, planning, and communication to make decisions and solve problems in applied situations involving numerical reasoning, probability, statistical analysis, finance, mathematical selection, and modeling with algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and discrete mathematics.
 
Geometry
 
In Geometry, students will build on the knowledge and skills for mathematics in Kindergarten-Grade 8 and Algebra I to strengthen their mathematical reasoning skills in geometric contexts. Within the course, students will begin to focus on more precise terminology, symbolic representations, and the development of proofs. Students will explore concepts covering coordinate and transformational geometry; logical argument and constructions; proof and congruence; similarity, proof, and trigonometry; two- and three-dimensional figures; circles; and probability. Students will connect previous knowledge from Algebra I to Geometry through the coordinate and transformational geometry strand. In the logical arguments and constructions strand, students are expected to create formal constructions using a straight edge and compass. Though this course is primarily Euclidean geometry, students should complete the course with an understanding that non-Euclidean geometries exist. In proof and congruence, students will use deductive reasoning to justify, prove and apply theorems about geometric figures. Throughout the standards, the term "prove" means a formal proof to be shown in a paragraph, a flow chart, or two-column formats. Proportionality is the unifying component of the similarity, proof, and trigonometry strand. Students will use their proportional reasoning skills to prove and apply theorems and solve problems in this strand. The two- and three-dimensional figure strand focuses on the application of formulas in multi-step situations since students have developed background knowledge in two- and three-dimensional figures. Using patterns to identify geometric properties, students will apply theorems about circles to determine relationships between special segments and angles in circles. Due to the emphasis of probability and statistics in the college and career readiness standards, standards dealing with probability have been added to the geometry curriculum to ensure students have proper exposure to these topics before pursuing their post-secondary education.
 
Algebra 1


The main goal of Algebra 1 is to develop fluency in working with linear equations. Students will extend their experiences with tables, graphs, and equations and solve linear equations and inequalities and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Students will extend their knowledge of the number system to include irrational numbers. Students will generate equivalent expressions and use formulas. Students will simplify polynomials and begin to study quadratic relationships. Students will use technology and models to investigate and explore mathematical ideas and relationships and develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations. Students will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life's experiences.

 

 
Algebra 2

 

In Algebra 2 students will build upon the concepts established in Algebra 1. We will focus on number sense, functions, transformations and systems. Knowledge of the concepts will be explored through multiple methods (graphically, verbally, algebraically, experimentally, etc…). Additionally, students will explore making connections between these different methods and applying them to real world situations through the use of technology.

 
Last Modified on December 7, 2013