Course Descriptions and Syllabi                      

 

English 3 Advanced Placement: English Language and Composition

Dennis Gray

dgray@eisd.net

(210) 444-4309

Tutoring Schedule:  Weekday mornings (Tues.—Fri.)—8:00 – 8:30 AM;  Any afternoon by appointment with at least 2 days prior notice.

Homework:  Students enrolled in this course are expected to read independently at home on a nightly basis.  Success on the AP Language test and in college English classes depends on strong reading skills that can truly only be developed with intense immersion in the practice of active reading.  Students are held accountable for their independent reading through weekly quizzes on Fridays.  Additionally, students are frequently asked to respond to their reading in class and as homework.  A dedicated composition book will serve as a record of these reflections. This expectation and the related procedures will continue throughout the school year.

            A second crucial component of the AP Language curriculum is an ongoing vocabulary enrichment study.  Students are given a list of general terms every Monday to study during the week in preparation for another quiz on Friday.  Other targeted terms are studied in class.

            Other homework may be assigned during the week (up to three days per week), usually a review activity or completion of an in-class assignment.

            I generally try to avoid assigning work on the weekends.  I understand that students are young adult individuals with other family, academic, and personal commitments.

Make-up work / Grades / Attendance:  I generally follow district policy regarding these concerns; any deviation from district policy is to the advantage of the student.

            I assign many more daily activities than I actually apply grades to.  Much of the work we do in class is of a training nature (for the AP Language test in May).  These tend to be designated as participation grades.  Major, comprehensive assignments such as timed essays, projects, and independent literary analyses are graded on a scale from 65 (attempted, yet seriously lacking in effort / understanding) to 95 (nearly flawless in terms of understanding if not execution).

            I do accept late work past the 2-week district mark, but these unfortunately become a lower-priority to enter into the gradebook as it is a huge task to keep up with the constant inflow of on-time assignments and the demands of giving students proper written feedback on essays, etc.

I hope you find you can trust me to make expert professional and educational decisions to the utmost benefit of your young adult’s personal and academic growth.  While the immediate goal of the AP Language class is to prepare your child for success on the College Board AP exam, we work toward producing higher-level reading, writing, analytical, and evaluative decision-making skills as well as providing a lifelong foundation for literary and life enrichment and future academic success.

I welcome you to contact me at any time for any reason.  Thank you for entrusting me with your child’s Language Arts education. I strive to live up to your lofty expectations, and anything information you can provide to help me further these goals is appreciated.

                                                                                    --Dennis Gray

 

 
AP English Language and Composition

 

Dennis Gray, Memorial High School T-STEM Academy

2013-2014 Syllabus

 

 

Course Assignments:

This course is taught with an emphasis on the study and practice of the reading and writing connection in learning and follows the curricular requirements described in the AP English Course Description. We will base our activities on a variety of formats: small group activities, large group discussions, and individual classroom and homework activities. To encourage active reading and critical analysis skills, students are assigned written work in conjunction with reading. These activities often include discussion and annotation based on a skillful analysis of the components of language: diction, imagery, details, language, syntax, and tone. Frequent quizzes (often unannounced) will be administered to assess the student’s fulfillment of daily reading responsibilities.

 

Students enrolled in this course are expected to read independently at home on a nightly basis.  Success on the AP Language test and in college English classes depends on strong reading skills that can truly only be developed with intense immersion in the practice of active reading.  Students are held accountable for their independent reading through weekly quizzes on Fridays.  Additionally, students are frequently asked to respond to their reading in class and as homework.  A dedicated composition book will serve as a record of these reflections. This expectation and the related procedures will continue throughout the school year.

           

A second crucial component of the AP Language curriculum is an ongoing vocabulary enrichment study.  Students are given a list of general terms every Monday to study during the week in preparation for another quiz on Friday.  Other targeted terms are studied in class.

 

The readings for English Language and Composition are primarily nonfiction (essays,

speeches, letters, diaries, newspaper and magazine articles, and longer works). These

readings are the springboard for nearly all writing assignments (essays, journals, and shorter writing activities).

 

Reading journals are an important and regular aspect of this course. These journals have two overall purposes: one, to respond to the readings (as well as reflect on one’s own writing)— their content and form—including imitating many of the styles and techniques studied; and two, to help students develop voice and fluidity in their writing.

 

Formal essays will be assigned outside of class time to provide students with the opportunity to take certain pieces fully through the writing process. These essays will take various forms, including personal narration, description, expository analysis, comparison/contrast, argumentation and synthesis. It is expected that the majority of these assignments will be submitted word processed in MLA format. Both peers and the instructor will evaluate essays and provide feedback on how to improve them. There must be a great degree of care and attention to detail with these essays—and patience, as students will take the papers through several drafts.

 

A researched essay synthesized from a variety of sources—essays, books, speeches, letters, magazine and newspaper articles—and formatted using MLA standards will follow the mid-year break. Timed essays will be written in class to help students gain familiarity with College Board testing standards and expectations. The prompts for these essays will be generated based on class readings or taken from actual AP English Language and Composition tests. These essays will require rhetorical and stylistic analysis and/or well-reasoned argumentation and synthesis. Each of these essays will be evaluated according to the criteria of the AP English Language and Composition Free Response Scoring Rubrics. Students are required to sit for the AP English Language Exam in May.

GOALS:

The College Board AP English Language and Composition Course Description states that, upon completing this course, students should be able to:

· recognize a variety of rhetorical strategies and techniques

· apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing

· analyze and interpret samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an author s

use of language to create and sustain arguments based on readings, research, and/or

personal experience

· write for a variety of purposes

· produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a

complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary

and/or secondary sources, cogent explanations, and clear transitions

· demonstrate understanding and mastery of standard written English as well as stylistic

maturity in their own writings

· demonstrate understanding of the conventions of citing primary and secondary

sources

· move effectively through the stages of the writing process, with careful attention to

inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review

· write thoughtfully about their own process of composition

· revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience

· analyze images and visual representations as texts

· evaluate and incorporate reference documents into researched papers

 

AP Curricular Requirements

C1: Students write in several forms about a variety of subjects.

C2: Students write essays that proceed through several stages or drafts, with revision aided

by teachers or peers.

C3: Students write in informal contexts to facilitate awareness of themselves as writers and

writing techniques that aid reading.

C4: The course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing based on reading a

variety of prose styles and genres.

C5: The course requires readings (primarily non-fiction) that allow students to identify and

explain an author’s use of rhetorical strategies.

C6: Students analyze graphic and visual images as forms of text and the relation of those

images to written texts.

C7: The course teaches research skills and assigns projects such as the researched argument

paper.

C8: The course teaches students to cite sources using a recognized editorial style.

C9: AP teacher provides instruction and feedback on students’ writing, both before and after

students revise their work.

 

GRADING POLICY

Nine Weeks grade: Essays, Tests, and Quizzes at 60% and Homework, Class work and

Participation at 40%

Semester grade: 75% quarter grades and 25% final exam

· Students are responsible for scheduling makeup work within two days of returning to

school.

· Make-up work will not be done during class time; it is to be done before and/or after

school.

· Students absent on a date when an assignment is due must turn in the assignment on

the day he/she returns to school or receive no credit for that assignment.

 

Course Strategies

Discussion—class discussions about the works we read and analyze, whole-class and in groups, led the instructor and students.

Reader Responses—Journal-like compositions (of 200-400 words each) about the readings and the students’ own writing, their subjects, language and strategies. For many of these responses, students will be asked to imitate the style, structure, and/or techniques studied.

SOAPSTone analyses—identifying the speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject and tone

Says/Does exercises—analyzing each paragraph to see how the author is building his or her point

Annotation—identifying key words, phrases, concepts and ideas in each paragraph; asking and writing down questions that come to mind; making connections in the text

Visuals—juxtaposing visuals (photos, images, prints of art, comic strips, graphics of all sorts) on a page with student essays and Reader Responses that communicate in some way what he/she has been writing about in the essay or reading about in the written text.

 

Course Texts:

The Sundance Writer and The Sundance Reader (essays and nonfiction) 2nd Edition, Harcourt

Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes, The American Experience, 2000, Prentice Hall

The Bedford Reader (essays and nonfiction), 5th Edition, St. Martin’s Press

Everyday Use: Rhetoric at Work in Reading and Writing, AP Edition, 2005, Pearson

The Mercury Reader (essays and nonfiction), 2001 Edition, Pearson

Research Writing: Using Traditional and Electronic Sources, N. Joseph, 1999, Prentice Hall

The Visual Experience, 3rd Edition, 2005, Davis Publications

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass, Glencoe

Biography and Autobiography, 2000, Prentice Hall

In Cold Blood, Truman Capote

Silent Spring, Rachel Carson

Unit One: (9 Weeks)

 

Reading (C5)

Rhetoric in Narrative, ch.6, Everyday Use

Strategies for writing narration, pp 209-219, Sundance Writer

“The Fender-Bender” by

Telling a Story, pp 39-48, Bedford Reader

“Champion of the World,” by Maya Angelou, Bedford Reader

“University Days,” by James Thurber, Bedford Reader

“The Lottery,” by Shirley Jackson, Bedford Reader

Narration, pp 39-44, Sundance Reader

“Shooting an Elephant,” G. Orwell, Sundance Reader

“The Lesson,” N. McCall, Sundance Reader

“Everything Has a Name,” H. Keller, Mercury Reader

From Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes, Mercury Reader

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Silent Spring, Rachel Carson

 

Writing/Activities

Students write a Reader Response for each of the essays and 3-6 for the longer final two works (C3). With three of the Responses, the students will include a visual (or group of) that they feel communicates what the piece expresses (in whatever way), as well as a paragraph interpreting and analyzing these visuals (C6) and how they relate to the written text.

 

Three essays are analyzed using the says/does method. Two of them are photocopied and annotated (collaboratively with peers).

 

All texts are analyzed using the SOAPSTone method (C3, C5)

 

Essay: 3-4-page Personal Narration using one or a blend of the styles studied (C1).

Accompanying the essay is a visual (or group of) that communicates what the students have been writing about (C6). For each visual a paragraph is composed with both a generalization about the visual and how it relates to what the student is writing in his essay and supporting evidence from the details of the visual. As students draft and redraft, the instructor  provides mini-lessons on varying sentence constructions, effective use of diction, among other things. Students meet with the instructor individually in conference shortly after beginning to go over the student’s  approach,

Plan, and any writing problems that may have presented themselves(C9). Students also choose a visual from The Visual Experience that they feel compliments their story. In a paragraph, students explain their choice of visual and how it relates to their narrative (C6). Peer evaluation just before revision is mandatory for all papers (C2).

 

Essay: 2-3 page exposition comparing and contrasting three rhetorical devices or strategies used in two of the essays read during this period (C1, C4). The instructor shares a strong example of this type of paper from previous years, helping students gain a perspective on the assignment and expectations. Writing instruction and peer evaluations are as above (C9). The instructor’s feedback on final drafts helps in subsequent papers and builds on expectations.

 

Essay: 2-3 page comparison and contrast of two passages in Hobbes’ Leviathan.

 

Un-timed AP-like essay (analytical) (C4)

 

Assessments

Weekly vocabulary tests (vocabulary taken from readings)

Quizzes on home reading assignments

Test on the rhetorical strategies used in the essays and Silent Spring

Test on Life of Frederick Douglass

 

Unit Two: (9 Weeks)

 

Reading (C5)

Writing as Process, pp 88-116, Everyday Use

What is Description, pp 172-185, Sundance Writer

“Out There,” by Truman Capote, Sundance Writer

“Fear and Dread in Cyberspace,” by Kevin Whitelaw, Sundance Writer

Writing with your senses, pp 92-101, Bedford Reader

“The Death of the Moth,” by Virginia Woolf, Bedford Reader

“Once more to the Lake,” by E. B. White, Bedford Reader

“The Allegory of the Cave,” by Plato, Mercury Reader

“Three Days to See,” by Helen Keller

“From Self Reliance,” by Ralph Waldo Emerson, American Experience

“From Walden,” by Henry D. Thoreau

“From Of Plymouth Plantation,” by William Bradford, American Experience

The Visual Experience, pp 452-473

In Cold Blood, Truman Capote

 

Writing/Activities

All of the readings above are analyzed using the SOAPSTone analysis.

 

Reader Responses completed on all works read. For In Cold Blood and “The Allegory of the Cave,” a visual (or group of), with a paragraph for each analyzing how the visual text and the written text have similar rhetorical choices (C6).

 

Two essays are photocopied and annotated (both collaboratively and individually) (C5).

 

Essay: 2-3 page description imitating one of the essays read during this period (C1, C4), with use of as many sensory details as possible. Writing instruction focuses on diction, incorporating sensory details and varying sentence structures. Peer evaluations during first draft (C9). Instructor’s  feedback follows final draft.

 

Essay: 2-3 pages analyzing one of the essays for which a says/does analysis was done

(C4). How the writer uses language—at least three rhetorical strategies—to describe his

subject. Concentrates on how the language (strategies) changes over the course of the essay and what those changes add to the author’s overall purpose (C5). An example essay from previous years prepares students for the assignment. Mini-lessons on logical organization, balancing examples and commentary, and anything other techniques students may need. Students, as usual, evaluate each other’s papers just before revision of the first and second drafts. The instructor meets with students during one of these drafts to conference over the paper (C2, C9).

 

Un-timed AP-like essay (synthesis) (C4).

 

Assessments

Weekly vocabulary test

Quizzes on reading assignments

Test on “Allegory of the Cave” (its conclusions applied to some of the essays read)

Test on the rhetorical techniques in some of the essays.

AP-like essay test on Capotes’ use of rhetorical devices in a passage from In Cold Blood.

 

Unit Three: (9 Weeks)

 

Reading (C5, C7, C8)

Argument and Persuasion, pp 463-475, Sundance Writer

“Kiss of Death,” by Armando Rendon, Sundance Writer

“Cultural Baggage,” by Barbara Ehrenreich, Sundance Writer

“Physician-Assisted Suicide is Ethical,” by Jack Kevorkian, Sundance Writer

Persuasion, pp 461-477, Bedford Reader

“The Penalty of Death,” by H. L. Mencken, Bedford Reader

“Disability,” by Nancy Mairs, Bedford Reader

“Why Prisons Don’t Work,” by Wilbert Rideau, Sundance Reader

“Fatherless America,” by David Blankenhorn, Sundance Reader

“Why we need to understand Science,” by Carl Sagan, Sundance Reader

Documenting Sources and Preparing an MLA Works Cited List, chapters six and

seven, Research Writing

“Of the Things for Which Men, and Especially Princes, Are Praised or Blamed,” by N.

Machiavelli, Mercury Reader

From A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift, Bedford Reader

Letters between anthropologists Franz Boas and Margeret Mead, Bedford Reader

 

Writing/Activities

Reader Responses on all pieces above

 

All analyzed using SOAPSTone method

 

Two are completely annotated

Three analyzed with says/does method (C3, C5)

 

Essay: 4-5 page researched argument (C1, C4). Students choose a modern social

phenomenon to research. The research paper is designed to help students synthesize

information from multiple sources (speeches, essays, technical documents, newspaper and magazine articles and books) and evaluate texts via a researched argumentative paper and will be planned to correspond with the emphasis the College Board is placing on research and graphic material. Students will apply MLA standards of publishing and

documentation and utilize both advanced publishing software and graphic programs (C7, C8). Before drafting, students confer with instructor about thesis and writing plan. Mini-lessons on organization, sentence structures, balancing examples and commentary, citing sources, among other things. Peer and teacher evaluations before

revision (C2, C9).

 

Essay: 2-3 page persuasive letter/essay to Time magazine supporting or refuting one of the arguments in the readings from this period (C1, C4). Writing instruction on applying the rhetorical techniques repeatedly studied this period to student’s own essay (C9). Peer evaluations before revision on first and second drafts (C2).

 

Timed AP-like essay (argumentative)(C4)

 

Assessments

Weekly vocabulary tests

Quizzes on reading assignments

Test on Identifying, analyzing, and evaluating an author’s use of rhetorical devices in

persuasive argument

Timed AP essay on a passage from A Modest Proposal

 

Unit Four: (9 weeks)

 

Reading (C5)

“CyberSoul Not Found,” by Michael Marriott, Sundance Reader

“Swept Away,” by Jodi Jacobson, Sundance Reader

“The Declaration of Independence,” by Thomas Jefferson, Sundance Reader

“Speech in the Virginia Convention,” by Patrick Henry, American Experience

“From Long walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela,” by Nelson

Mandela, Biography and Autobiography

“Separate but Equal,” by Rose Blue and Corinne Naden, Biography and Autobiography

Words and Change,” by Gloria Steinem, Sundance Writer

“Why Schools Don’t Educate,” by John Taylor Gatto, Sundance Writer

“The Highlighter Crisis,” by Lawrence Beyer, Bedford Reader

“I Have a Dream,” by M.L. King, American Experience

“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” by Jonathan Edwards, American Experience

 

Writing/Activities

Reader Responses with visuals

Annotations on photocopies of two essays

 

Sermon employing many of Edwards techniques and appeals (written and presented)

 

SOAPSTone analyses all essays (C3, C5)

 

Multiple choice questions as on the AP Exam practiced and composed.

 

Essay: 2-3 page argumentative analysis of one of the final two pieces above (C1, C4).

 

4-5 Timed AP-like essays (synthesis, analytical, argumentative) (C4). As we are approaching the AP Exam, students write more and more under the same constraints. We begin a few of these types of exams in class and finish them for homework.

 

Assessments

Weekly vocabulary tests

Quizzes on reading assignments

Test on Identifying, analyzing, and evaluating an author’s use of rhetorical devices

After the AP Exam, we work on various drafts of college application essays and do exercises and activities with poetry.

 

Memorial High School

Advanced Placement English III:  English Language and Composition

2016 - 2017

Instructor: Mr. D. Gray

Room: 513 (STEM Building)

Phone: TBA                                                                                

Email: dgray@eisd.net

Tutorial Times: Weekday Mornings (Mon.--Fri.)  8:00 am - 8:30 am

 

Course Description:

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a study of rhetoric and argument. Students practice effective writing and critical reading at a level that replicates the college freshman composition course.

 

An Important Note About Academic Rigor in AP Classes at Memorial High School:

By electing to take this course, students commit themselves to a rigorous, fast-paced college level curriculum.  Student success depends on more than formal credentials such as high test scores or outstanding grade records.  Since the purpose of the class is to prepare students for the AP exam in May, students must be aware that the pace of the class cannot be adjusted for those unable or unwilling to keep up with the demands of the course.

 

Special Expectations:

Be prepared to read independently at home (on your own time) for an average of 2-3 hours per week.  Our class time will be dedicated to the working analysis of these reading assignments, and we will not be reading major works together or aloud in class.  Also be aware that additional homework is assigned at least 3 days per week, to be due the following day.

 

Supplies:

All items should be brought to class everyday

Ÿ  Pen or pencil

Ÿ  Paper

Ÿ  2 Composition Books to be dedicated to this class—one to be kept in class, and one for home assignments.

This is a crucial element of the class.  Students cannot be successful in AP English 3 without these.  Students need to have these by the end of the 1st week of class.

Ÿ  Any assignments or notes that we may be working on in class

 

Expectations:

Ÿ  Attend all classes and be on time - If you are going to be out or late with an approved excuse (doctor’s note, field trip, etc.) please let me know as soon as possible in advance

Ÿ  Complete and submit all daily work and projects on time

Points will be deducted for late work:

Ÿ  - 10 for each class period late; up to 3 class periods

Ÿ  No late work will be accepted after 3 class periods

Ÿ  Students turning in work that is more than 3 periods late will receive a zero on that assignment.

Ÿ  Homework is given regularly and you are expected to complete and return it to the best of your ability.  Late

 Homework will be treated as per the policy above.

Ÿ  Zero replacement policy:  students have one week from the issuance of progress reports to replace any zeroes which may appear.   Students may choose to do additional work after school or in Tuesday/Thursday tutorials to replace any zeroes which may appear.  Tutorials will be available Mondays and Wednesdays from 8:00—8:30 AM and by appointment.

Ÿ  Take all tests, semester exams, and the AP exam in May.

Ÿ  Seek assistance and ask questions -This is very important- English class often deals with complicated processes. If at any time you are not sure of anything, feel free to interrupt with a serious question or problem, or come to tutoring.

 

Daily Work:

You will have at least three daily grades per 2 week period. These could be anything from taking notes and paying attention in class to worksheets, to small group creative projects, to brief written journals, or full-length, edited writing samples. Daily grades are due when specified. The only exceptions are with excused absences, during which students will have two days to make-up these or alternate assignments for full credit.

 

Test Grades:

Ÿ  You will have one test grade per 2 week period.

Ÿ  Test grades will be timed writings as seen on the AP exam.


Grading will follow District Policy:  Please consult your student handbook for details.

 

Tardy/ Absence Policy

Ÿ  Be in your assigned seat and working on the warm-up when the tardy bell rings- NO EXCEPTIONS

Ÿ  After two tardies we will have a teacher-student conference

Ÿ  After three tardies I will be forced to contact your parent/ guardian

Ÿ  If you are tardy 15 or more minutes after the bell rings counts as an absence unless otherwise excused by the attendance office

Ÿ  Remember, you can only miss up to eight days (first semester) to nine days (second semester). Three tardies are considered and absence.

Ÿ  Anything exceeding these guidelines will result in automatic credit denial.

 

Classroom Rules & Procedures:

Ÿ  All school wide rules and procedures will be followed in Mr. Gray’s classroom. This includes dress code (See student rules handbook).These rules are non-negotiable:

Ÿ  Bathroom/ Hall Pass Procedure

Students will be issued five bathroom/ hall passes per grading period. These passes are to be turned in to Mr. Gray in exchange for a hall pass at anytime during the class period. New passes will be issued every nine weeks. In order to cut down on interruptions, every unused pass handed in at the end of the nine week grading period will add ten points to your test grade for a maximum possible +50 points.

Ÿ  Mr. Gray does not “collect” your work. You will be responsible for turning in all of your work to the period files on his desk or the notebook crates at the front of the room. This goes for late work, too.

Ÿ  If you are absent, you will find any directions you missed posted on a board behind my desk and any materials in a file nearby. Please do not ask Mr. Gray what you missed. Go to that section of the room, get what you need, look it over, and then feel free to ask any questions.

 

Disciplinary Issues

Hopefully we don’t have any. I believe in a classroom based on mutual respect. I show you respect and you show it in return. If, for some reason, that respect breaks down, I will issue three warnings for specific behavior before going through other channels (detention, official write-ups, etc.). These three warnings are cumulative, which means, for example, if on Monday, I issue two warnings to you for “talking” you only have one warning left before we have to have a conference, whether the “violation” takes place the next day or a month later.

English 4 Advanced Placement: English Literature and Composition

Dennis Gray

dgray@eisd.net

(210) 444-4309

Tutoring Schedule:  Weekday mornings (Tues.—Fri.)—7:30 – 8:30 AM;  Any afternoon by appointment with at least 2 days prior notice.

Homework:  Students enrolled in this course are expected to read independently at home on a nightly basis.  Success on the AP Literature test and in college English classes depends on strong reading skills that can truly only be developed with intense immersion in the practice of active reading.  Students are held accountable for their independent reading through weekly quizzes on Fridays.  Additionally, students are frequently asked to respond to their reading in class and as homework.  A dedicated composition book will serve as a record of these reflections. This expectation and the related procedures will continue throughout the school year.

            A second crucial component of the AP Literature curriculum is an ongoing vocabulary enrichment study.  Students are given a list of higher-level literary terms every Monday to study during the week in preparation for another quiz on Friday.  Other targeted terms are studied in class.

            Other homework may be assigned during the week (up to three days per week), usually a review activity or completion of an in-class assignment.

            I generally try to avoid assigning work on the weekends.  I understand that students are young adult individuals with other family, academic, and personal commitments.

Make-up work / Grades / Attendance:  I generally follow district policy regarding these concerns; any deviation from district policy is to the advantage of the student.

            I assign many more daily activities than I actually apply grades to.  Much of the work we do in class is of a training nature (for the AP Literature test in May).  These tend to be designated as participation grades.  Major, comprehensive assignments such as timed essays, projects, and independent literary analyses are graded on a scale from 65 (attempted, yet seriously lacking in effort / understanding) to 95 (nearly flawless in terms of understanding if not execution).

            I do accept late work past the 2-week district mark, but these unfortunately become a lower-priority to enter into the gradebook as it is a huge task to keep up with the constant inflow of on-time assignments and the demands of giving students proper written feedback on essays, etc.

I hope you find you can trust me to make expert professional and educational decisions to the utmost benefit of your young adult’s personal and academic growth.  While the immediate goal of the AP Literature class is to prepare your child for success on the College Board AP exam, we work toward producing higher-level reading, writing, analytical, and evaluative decision-making skills as well as providing a lifelong foundation for literary and life enrichment and future academic success.

I welcome you to contact me at any time for any reason.  Thank you for entrusting me with your child’s Language Arts education. I strive to live up to your lofty expectations, and anything information you can provide to help me further these goals is appreciated.

                                                                                    --Dennis Gray

 
 
 

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

 

Dennis Gray, Memorial High School T-STEM Academy

2013-2014 Syllabus

 

This college-level course requires effective writing in the expository, analytical, and argumentative modes and includes an intensive study of several genres of American, British, and World literature from the sixteenth century to the present.

 

Literary responses to texts will analyze tone and attitude, diction, detail, point of view, organization, and syntax. In addition, students will prepare for college entrance tests and college course work. Course requirements are based on the AP English course description and are intended to prepare students for the AP English Literature and Composition exam at the end of the academic year. This course will follow the curricular requirements described in the AP English course description.

 

The goals of the course will be achieved through the following methods of instruction:

• Student-led Discussion                                • Out-of-Class Reading (Novels and Plays)

• Teacher-Student Discourse                          • Cooperative Learning

• Guided Writing Practice                              • In-Class Timed Writing

• Out-of-Class Writing                                    • Student Writing Portfolio

• Integrated Technology-Based Projects        • Student-Teacher Conferencing

                                                                           for Writing Revisions

 

Students will write to understand in response to their readings through frequent annotation, free writing, and reaction/response essays.

 

Students will also write to evaluate through analytical, argumentative essays, using details from the text to support their arguments and analysis of the text.

 

Instruction and feedback on student writing will be provided before and after writing and revision through guided practice and student-teacher conferencing. Such instruction and feedback will help students develop rhetorical strategies that include controlling tone and a voice appropriate to them as writers as well as to their audience.

 

Course Goals

 

Students enrolled in this course are expected to read independently at home on a nightly basis.  Success on the AP Literature test and in college English classes depends on strong reading skills that can truly only be developed with intense immersion in the practice of active reading.  Students are held accountable for their independent reading through weekly quizzes on Fridays.  Additionally, students are frequently asked to respond to their reading in class and as homework.  A dedicated composition book will serve as a record of these reflections. This expectation and the related procedures will continue throughout the school year.

            A second crucial component of the AP Literature curriculum is an ongoing vocabulary enrichment study.  Students are given a list of higher-level literary terms every Monday to study during the week in preparation for another quiz on Friday.  Other targeted terms are studied in class.

 

 

Semester One

 

I. Introduction to Analysis

The student will write and revise compositions in response to interpretive exercises to explicate given literary selections; the student will be able to:

A. Analyze and answer questions based on literature, demonstrating knowledge of appropriate terminology

B. Write responses to interpretive exercises which explicate literary selections

C. Determine the correlation of a given rubric to given samples of analysis

D. Create rubrics for answers to questions about literature

E. Write essays using rubrics as a means of prewriting

F. Evaluate essays using rubrics

 

II. Short Prose Narrative

The student will explicate, in discussion or critical essay, short prose narratives; the student will be able to:

A. Analyze short prose narratives to determine the author's use of literary techniques

B. Evaluate the effective use of literary technique in short prose narratives

C. Write short essays explicating short prose narratives

D. Write short essays analyzing and evaluating short prose narratives

E. Evaluate short essays explicating short prose narratives

F. Use the creative process to write short prose narratives

G. Write analytical, argumentative essays in which students draw upon textual details to make

      and explain judgments about artistry and quality  

 

III. Poetry

The student will write and revise critical essays which explicate poetry, including considerations of structure and style as they affect content; the student will be able to:

A. Define and identify poetic techniques

B. Explicate poetry in discussion

C. Write essays of explication of poetry

D. Write essays analyzing and evaluating poetry

E. Evaluate poetic explications

F. Use the creative process to write poetry, if the student chooses

G. Write analytical, argumentative essays in which students draw upon textual details to make

      and explain judgments about artistry and quality  

 

IV. Long Prose Narrative

The student will explicate, in discussion or critical essay, novels, both assigned and self-selected; the student will be able to:

A. Analyze long prose narratives to determine the author's use of literary techniques

B. Evaluate the effective use of literary technique in long prose narratives;

C. Analyze long prose narratives to determine the historical implications of the work

D. Analyze long prose narratives to determine the sociological implications of the work

E. Analyze long prose narratives to determine the characteristics of the author's style

F. Write short essays explicating the literary techniques, historical or sociological implications, and author's style in a literary work as they combine to produce an effect on the reader

G. Write essays analyzing and evaluating various prose works

H. Write essays of explication synthesizing the impact of the techniques, historical or sociological implications, or style in two or more literary works

I. Write analytical, argumentative essays in which students draw upon textual details to make

      and explain judgments about artistry and quality  

 

V. Pre-Eighteenth Century Drama

The student will write, and/or present orally, critical analyses of plays, differentiating pre-18th century dramatic literature from other genres; the student will be able to:

A. Differentiate drama from other literary genres, especially modern drama

B. Analyze plays to determine the author's use of literary technique

C. Evaluate the effective use of literary technique in dramatic works

D. Write short essays explicating pre-18th century dramatic works

E. Write essays analyzing and evaluating pre-18th century dramatic works

F. Analyze the existence and effect of historical intrusion in dramatic works

G. Write analytical, argumentative essays in which students draw upon textual details to make

      and explain judgments about artistry and quality  

 

 

Semester Two

VI. Pre-Eighteenth Century Drama (Continued)

 

VII. Modern Drama

The student will write, and/or present orally, critical analyses which explain historical development of techniques and thematic emphases of modern drama as differentiated from pre-18th century drama; the student will be able to:

A. Analyze the existence and effect of historical intrusion in drama

B. Write short essays explicating dramatic works

C. Write essays synthesizing the impact of the use of dramatic techniques in two or more dramatic works, from the same or different literary periods

D. Write essays analyzing and evaluating various dramatic works

E. Evaluate the effectiveness of a performance of a dramatic work

F. Differentiate modern drama from pre-18th century drama

G. Write analytical, argumentative essays in which students draw upon textual details to make

      and explain judgments about artistry and quality  

 

VIII. Long Prose Narrative (Continued)

 

IX. Nonfiction Prose

The student will examine, in discussion and critical essay, the logic, language, syntax, structure, and tone of short nonfiction prose passages, as those elements combine to produce an effect on the reader; the student will be able to:

A. Identify patterns of organization of ideas

B. Differentiate impact of different patterns of organization

C. Determine the effect of diction, syntax, tone, and structure in nonfiction prose

D. Evaluate the effect of diction, syntax, tone, and structure in nonfiction prose

E. Write short essays of explication of nonfiction prose

F. Write essays analyzing and evaluating nonfiction prose

G. Evaluate short essays of explication of nonfiction prose

 

X. Evaluative Composition

The student will write documented evaluative and expository essays on topics relating to literature; the student will be able to:

A. Use the writing process and higher level thinking skills to write short essays of explication in response to questions about literary selections;

B. Use the writing process and higher level thinking skills to write long essays of explication of literary selections;

C. Use appropriate systems of documentation to identify sources of information used to support assertions;

D. Evaluate and revise mechanics, diction, syntax, and organization in personal and peer compositions.

E. Employ the feedback they receive from their peers and the teacher in moving their writing toward the stylistic maturity defined and described in the College Board Course Description of Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition.

 

XI. Test Preparation *

The student will develop and practice procedures for answering objective and subjective test items such as those appearing on the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition. The student will be able to:

A. Analyze essay questions to determine requirements of question and best order for response;

B. Provide required evidence and apply evidence to assertions of answer;

C. Analyze multiple choice questions to determine best question attack;

D. Use process of elimination and other question attack procedures appropriately;

E. Manage time appropriately to be able to attempt all questions possible.

 

*The activities of this class prepare the student to address the tasks on the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition, which consists of:

Two sets of multiple choice questions on given poems

Two sets of multiple choice questions on given short prose passages

An essay analyzing a given poem or poems, to be written in forty minutes

An essay analyzing a given prose passage, to be written in forty minutes

An essay addressing a topic related to the analysis of long work (novel, play, epic) to be written in forty minutes

 

Primary Texts

Meyer, Michael. The Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading Thinking, Writing. 8th Edition.   Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2008.

 

Harmon, William, and C. Hugh Holman. A Handbook to Literature. 8th Edition. Upper Saddle

 River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.

 

Secondary Texts

 

All the Pretty Horses, McCarthy

Heart of Darkness, Conrad

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, Shakespeare

 

The Tempest, Shakespeare

Beowulf, trans. Raffel

Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus, Shelley

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Twain

The Inheritors, Golding

The Death of a Salesman, Miller

“A Good Man is Hard to Find,” O’Connor

“Nam-Bok the Unveracious,” London

Short stories by London, Twain, Vonnegut, and others to be determined

Poems by Coleridge, Dickinson, Browning, Frost, and others to be determined

Short plays by Vasquez, Shepard, and others to be determined

Curriculum Guide Handouts


 

 

 


 

 

Literary Genres—Science Fiction

2016 - 2017

 

Course Description:

Literary Genres—Science Fiction follows a progression of thematic units, each comprising a wide variety of texts including: Novels, short stories, graphic storytelling, film, and related non-fiction scientific articles.  Units cover classic and current science-fiction themes including: Genetics and the “man-made monster,” biological evolution, theoretical physics and time travel, space exploration and alien life forms, and future utopian / dystopian societies.  Literary and scientific concepts are  taught within a historical context that shows the changes in the genre as science advances over the years alongside real-life applications of these principles.

 

 


 

HS ELAR TEKS

Last Modified on September 9, 2016
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